Widener Law professor speaks at distinguished conference in London
Public Relations - Published: April 16, 2014
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Professor Family’s work has taken her to London in the past as well. She spent the spring 2012 semester there serving as a visiting scholar at the Queen Mary School of Law.

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Associate Professor Jill E. Family spoke recently at a London, England conference examining migration issues. She was the only U.S.-based academic to present at the program, organized by a group of U.K. universities.

The event, “A Sea of Troubles? Problematising Migration Law,” was held Friday and Saturday, March 28 and 29 in association with Birkbeck College School of Law. Family, who specializes in immigration law, was part of a panel discussion. She spoke about her comparative study of immigration law in the United States and the United Kingdom.

The program was presented by the Migration and Law Network, which aims to promote migration law as a subject in U.K. universities. The conference gave professors, researchers and students an opportunity to present their work. In addition to the United Kingdom, other presenters came from Italy, France, Turkey, Ireland and the Netherlands.

Family’s work has taken her to London in the past as well. She spent the spring 2012 semester there serving as a visiting scholar at the Queen Mary School of Law. She researched the immigration adjudication system in the United Kingdom and compared and contrasted it with the U.S. immigration system. She also met with the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber), which is part of the U.K. Ministry of Justice.

In addition to teaching, Family directs Widener’s Law & Government Institute, the signature program on the university’s campus in Harrisburg, Pa. The institute is dedicated to exploring law that defines the structure and operation of government and the relationship between individuals and government.

“I’m thrilled to have taken part in this conference,” said Family. “The opportunity to share ideas internationally is invaluable to advance research, and it enhances teaching by providing an opportunity to learn about new perspectives, customs and techniques.”